Krishan Sharma
Technology Journalist

Krishan Sharma is a freelance journalist who writes for various consumer tech and business IT publications

Tech review: Samsung Galaxy TabPro S

Krishan Sharma
Technology Journalist

Krishan Sharma is a freelance journalist who writes for various consumer tech and business IT publications

Two-in-ones are increasingly popular and it’s easy to see why. Carrying a single device that can function as both a tablet and laptop offers much convenience, as devices like Microsoft’s Surface Pro 4 have proven.

However, Samsung’s latest two-in-one, the TabPro S, trumps the competition in a number of critical areas that might make it a better option for business users.

Samsung TabPro S tablet and laptop Samsung’s TabPro S has a longer battery life and a cheaper price tag than its competitors.

Firstly, the Windows 10 powered TabPro is thinner (6.3mm) and lighter (693g) than its rivals. The smaller footprint means it can be used as a tablet for extended periods without fatigue, something not so achievable with the heavier Surface
Pro 4. And unlike its rivals, the keyboard cover comes in the box, allowing you to use the device to its full potential from the start. The cover attaches magnetically to the tablet and can be folded into a base for laptop use similar to the iPad Pro, but isn’t as flexible as the wide-angle kickstand found on the Surface. That said, the TabPro is more stable on the lap and the lack of a kickstand means it can sit higher on the thighs as opposed to precariously on the knees. The typing experience on the full-size keyboard is good, with adequate travel, but the keys aren’t backlit. The 12-inch AMOLED display boasts richer colours and better contrast, giving content onscreen a vibrant sheen. The display holds up well outdoors with good brightness and limited reflection. 

Another plus is that the TabPro is the only two-in-one Windows PC offering 4G connectivity, making it ideal on the road. What’s more, the TabPro should get through almost an entire work day, with battery life coming in around eight hours – although expect a slightly lower runtime with mobile data use. The TabPro charges reasonably quickly, from dead flat to 100 per cent in a little over two hours.

The downside is the TabPro has no ports other than a single USB-C connector and a headphone jack, which means investing in adaptors. There’s no pen in the box, either, and no option to upgrade the RAM, storage or CPU, so you’re stuck with the Intel M3 processor, 128GB of storage and 4GB of RAM. Good news is it seems well optimised and rarely skipped a beat during a typical work day editing documents, checking email, performing light photo editing and web browsing with eight tabs open.

As a device looking to replace both your tablet and notebook, the TabPro gets a lot of things right. The lack of configuration options means that power users will be better served with the more powerful Surface Pro 4, but for everyone else the TabPro delivers where it counts with a longer battery life, thinner and lighter form factor, optional 4G connectivity and a cheaper price tag. Just be prepared to carry around an adaptor or two.

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