Growth Customer Experience Productivity Business IQ Trends Success Stories Tech Solutions Awards Business Tools Subscribe Tech Enquiry
Success Stories

Why regional does it better

Mike Doman
Technology Journalist

Mike Doman is a technology, lifestyle, industrial and education writer

Mike Doman
Technology Journalist

Mike Doman is a technology, lifestyle, industrial and education writer

We’ve all heard of small town hospitality, but technology is changing the way regional businesses operate. But are the fundamentals still the same?

Wollongong-based Brett Turley, or Mr Minimalism when he’s working as a fitness instructor, uses the “simplest and fewest elements … to create maximum effect” to get people fit – but his business plan, conversely, is sophisticated and complex.

At the heart of his business is customer service – a natural cornerstone of a business strategy in regional areas where word-of-mouth spreads like wildfire –complemented with comprehensive market research and a marketing mix with social media at the core.

“You’ve got a smaller population where people know each other, people talk, and it’s your reputation and the way you treat your customers that sets you above the rest of your competitors,” says Brett.

aerial view cattle farm

An open conversation

The biggest advantage for Brett is being a part of the community and having a short feedback loop from his customers.

“You do all the market research in the world and actually launch something, [but] all of a sudden you get feedback saying ‘This could be improved better. This could be an addition’ – it really opens your eyes to what you should be offering as opposed to what you are.”

And in regional centres or towns, where foot traffic isn’t in such rich supply as metropolitan areas, it’s this that sets regional businesses apart.

“We focus heavily on the community. If you build a community, they’ll support you when the times are tough, and they’ll also open your eyes to great new opportunities that you wouldn’t have thought of yourself.”

Healthy competition

For Telstra Country Wide Area General Manager for South West Victoria, Bill Mundy, the regional marketplace is more competitive than many people realise.

“What regional businesses do better is they know how to compete, and compete hard. They have incredibly mobile customers, who can get services from a digital medium, or shipped in from a metropolitan area, so they’re personalising their service and their product offerings to the customers, to ensure they’re able to build a strong relationship with their customers.”

Brett Turley's tips for metro small business

  1. Under promise and over deliver. “Set yourself above the average business in your industry by delivering that next level of client satisfaction.”
  2. Marketing is good, but being good is better. “You can’t hide. You really can’t hide in a regional area. Put out a big smoking new campaign… to make yourself look like you’re the leader in your field, but all it takes is for one or two clients to come through, and if your systems and your skills aren’t up to what you’re claiming… people hear about it.”
  3. Be calculated with your marketing. “I was quite lucky there was a market, which allowed me to structure my website, the SEO, the content on my website… my USP even, to really stand out in the area I’m in to attract the right sort of client.”
  4. Customers first. “People know each other. People talk. It’s really your reputation and the way you treat your customers that sets you above the rest of your competitors.”
Unsure how technology can help you reach new markets?

Visit your local Telstra Business Centre. To find your closest centre, head here.

Find Out More

Dave Macdonald and Annette Kaitinis of Scoot Boot
Growth
Growth
Annette Kaitinis: growing a business means knowing when to trot, canter, and gallop

Annette Kaitinis and Dave Macdonald have taken their small business with a big idea from Tasmania to the world. After just four short years, they're reaching international mark...

Charmaine Saunders of Mainie in store holding a traditional Indigenous-inspired garment.
Growth
Growth
Culture meets commerce: These Indigenous businesses are embracing both

These four Indigenous businesses – NAISDA, Purple House, Bush Medijina, and Mainie – combine commerce and culture. Find out how business works for people by Telstra Smarter Bus...

A photo of a woman from behind working at an office desk
Business IQ
Business IQ
How to empower staff and protect data security

Your cyber security is only as strong as its weakest link and that weak link is often the human element. Cyber security is a human problem. That’s why it is critical to invest...

A large amount of multi-coloured post-it notes lying in a large pile on a white floor.
Productivity
Productivity
How to multi-task and do what matters

As a busy business owner, it’s tempting to try juggling all the balls at once in order to get things done. But using the right technologies and processes – not constantly multi...