Productivity

The computer monitors that are a sight for sore eyes

Jenneth Orantia
Smarter Writer

Jenneth Orantia is a journalist who has been reporting on tech developments and trends for the last decade

Jenneth Orantia
Smarter Writer

Jenneth Orantia is a journalist who has been reporting on tech developments and trends for the last decade

With more and more workers opting for the mobility benefits of a laptop versus a desktop, the screen that you use on a day-to-day basis is likely to be a lot smaller than 19 inches.

As convenient as it is to have a computer that you can grab and go quickly, studies have shown that eyestrain and other negative visual symptoms associated with small screens affect up to 90 per cent of information workers.

The simple solution is getting a larger screen that you can use whenever you’re sitting in the office. The good news is that large computers monitors have become far more affordable in the last few years, and 27-inch displays in particular give you that much-needed screen size boost while supplying the infrastructure to also boost productivity. With that much display real estate to work with, you can have up to three windows tiled on the screen side-by-side.

When shopping for a computer monitor, the obvious factors are price and size, but you should also be looking at display resolution (that is, how many pixels the screen is capable of reproducing) and its adjustability.

woman putting in eyedrops at her desk with computer

Working sharp, working smart

A higher display resolution results in sharper-looking text and the ability to fit more on the screen, but it’s a law of diminishing returns – as soon as you get up to UltraHD level (that is, four times the resolution of Full HD), you’d be hard picked to tell the difference at screen sizes smaller than 30 inches.

The adjustability of the monitor goes back to ergonomics and flexibility, and this is typically what distinguishes monitors designed for business as opposed to consumers. Things to look for include the ability to not just swivel the display from side-to-side, but also pivot up and down, and the ability to adjust the height of the monitor stand.

Here are three LCD monitors that you should consider adding to your workspace.

1. Dell UltraSharp 27 Monitor U2715H

If you’re happy to spend a little extra for quality – without going overboard – consider the Dell U2715H. This 27-inch monitor is just as sharp as its product name implies, offering a crisp 2560 x 1440 Quad HD resolution in a surprisingly compact frame. Tuned at 99 per cent of the sRGB profile, the U2715H displays colours that are life-like and accurate, which is important if you ever need to proof graphics or images on-screen. A full range of movements is supported, including a height adjustable stand and the ability to rotate the display 90 degrees for use in portrait orientation.

RRP $899.00

2. Dell 27 Touch Monitor P2714T 

iPad and tablet users don’t have to get all the fun. The Dell P2714T is designed to be used with the touch-friendly Windows 8 operating system, with support for up to 10 points of touch input simultaneously – more than enough to handle the various gestures in Windows 8. The display resolution isn’t as high as its UltraSharp stablemate, at 1920 x 1080 pixels, but it offers the same Premium Panel guarantee that means you can swap it out for a new monitor if you spot even a single dead pixel on the screen. The versatile stand also lets you lean the monitor all the way back to use it tablet-style.RRP

$899.00

3. AOC Q2770PQU

AOC is well known for its affordable yet full-featured computer monitors, and the Q2770PQU continues the tradition in fine form, offering all the features of the pricier models for a much cheaper price tag. This includes a roomy 27-inch display, sharp 2560 x 1440 Quad HD display resolution, and a fully adjustable stand that lets you change the screen’s height, orientation and viewing angle. It also includes all of the latest port connectors to ensure maximum compatibility with every laptop (including DisplayPort, DVI and HDMI), along with a four-port USB hub.

RRP $649.00

Prices correct at time of publishing.

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