Jenneth Orantia
Smarter Writer

Jenneth Orantia is a journalist who has been reporting on tech developments and trends for the last decade

Jenneth Orantia
Smarter Writer

Jenneth Orantia is a journalist who has been reporting on tech developments and trends for the last decade

The latest stats on physical activity in Australia are concerning. According to The Department of Health, low levels of physical activity is the second greatest contributor, behind tobacco smoking, to the burden of cancer in Australia. Here’s how to put your body in motion and move it, move it at work.

1. Walking Hard

Placing all the items that you need to do your job within easy reaching distance may sound convenient, but it’s actually minimising the amount of movement you do throughout the day. Try putting key items that you use on a regular basis, such as the printer, stapler, highlighters and folders on the other end of your office to force you to get up whenever you need to use them.

2. Have Walking Meetings

The late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, was famous for having walking meetings with his colleagues, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and US President Barack Obama have since adopted the practice. Research from Stanford University indicates that walking meetings aren’t just good for the physical activity – it actually boosts creative inspiration too, with creative output shooting up to 60 per cent while walking.

2. Have walking meetings

The late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, was famous for having walking meetings with his colleagues, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and US President Barack Obama have since adopted the practice. Research from Stanford University (http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/april/walking-vs-sitting-042414.html) indicates that walking meetings aren’t just good for the physical activity – it actually boosts creative inspiration too, with creative output shooting up to 60 per cent while walking. 

 

3. Stand while chatting

If there isn’t a practical reason you need to sit down to have a phone conversation then get people to call you on your mobile. It’s a great way of freeing up those vocal cords and it also allows you the opportunity to stretch your legs, and even get some fresh air. If you work in close proximity to co-workers, you’ll also do them a courtesy – researchers from the University of San Diego (http://healthland.time.com/2013/03/14/why-overheard-cell-phone-conversations-are-so-annoying/) found that one-sided phone conversations are more distracting than hearing a conversation between two people. 

 

4. Invest in a standing desk or treadmill desk

You may not be able to find these in Ikea or Fantastic Furniture, but according to research published by the BBC in collaboration with the University of Chester (http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-24532996), standing up at a desk for three to four hours a day, over the working week is the equivalent of running about 10 marathons a year. You can step it up a notch by investing in a treadmill desk, which couples a standing desk with a treadmill – either as separate items or integrated into the one unit. 

 

5. Workus interruptus

We’ve all been there before, when you’re so engrossed in what you’re doing that the time flies by. Before you know it, you’ve been sitting at your desk for four hours straight with your only movement being your eyes across the screen and your fingers flying over the keyboard. This sort of laser-like focus is good when you’re in the zone and getting things done, but it’s not so good for your health and fitness if you do it on a regular basis. 

2. Have walking meetings

The late Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple, was famous for having walking meetings with his colleagues, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and US President Barack Obama have since adopted the practice. Research from Stanford University (http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/april/walking-vs-sitting-042414.html) indicates that walking meetings aren’t just good for the physical activity – it actually boosts creative inspiration too, with creative output shooting up to 60 per cent while walking. 

 

3. Stand while chatting

If there isn’t a practical reason you need to sit down to have a phone conversation then get people to call you on your mobile. It’s a great way of freeing up those vocal cords and it also allows you the opportunity to stretch your legs, and even get some fresh air. If you work in close proximity to co-workers, you’ll also do them a courtesy – researchers from the University of San Diego (http://healthland.time.com/2013/03/14/why-overheard-cell-phone-conversations-are-so-annoying/) found that one-sided phone conversations are more distracting than hearing a conversation between two people. 

 

4. Invest in a standing desk or treadmill desk

You may not be able to find these in Ikea or Fantastic Furniture, but according to research published by the BBC in collaboration with the University of Chester (http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-24532996), standing up at a desk for three to four hours a day, over the working week is the equivalent of running about 10 marathons a year. You can step it up a notch by investing in a treadmill desk, which couples a standing desk with a treadmill – either as separate items or integrated into the one unit. 

 

5. Workus interruptus

We’ve all been there before, when you’re so engrossed in what you’re doing that the time flies by. Before you know it, you’ve been sitting at your desk for four hours straight with your only movement being your eyes across the screen and your fingers flying over the keyboard. This sort of laser-like focus is good when you’re in the zone and getting things done, but it’s not so good for your health and fitness if you do it on a regular basis. 

3. Stand While Chatting

If there isn’t a practical reason you need to sit down to have a phone conversation then get people to call you on your mobile. It’s a great way of freeing up those vocal cords and it also allows you the opportunity to stretch your legs, and even get some fresh air. If you work in close proximity to co-workers, you’ll also do them a courtesy – researchers from the University of San Diego found that one-sided phone conversations are more distracting than hearing a conversation between two people.

4. Invest in a Standing Desk or Treadmill Desk

You may not be able to find these in Ikea or Fantastic Furniture, but according to research published by the BBC in collaboration with the University of Chester, standing up at a desk for three to four hours a day over the working week is the equivalent of running about 10 marathons a year. You can step it up a notch by investing in a treadmill desk, which couples a standing desk with a treadmill – either as separate items or integrated into the one unit.

5. Workus Interruptus

We’ve all been there before - you’re so engrossed in what you’re doing that the time flies by. Before you know it, you’ve been sitting at your desk for four hours straight with your only movement being your eyes across the screen and your fingers flying over the keyboard. This sort of laser-like focus is good when you’re in the zone and getting things done, but it’s not so good for your health and fitness if you do it on a regular basis.

5. Workus interruptus

We’ve all been there before, when you’re so engrossed in what you’re doing that the time flies by. Before you know it, you’ve been sitting at your desk for four hours straight with your only movement being your eyes across the screen and your fingers flying over the keyboard. This sort of laser-like focus is good when you’re in the zone and getting things done, but it’s not so good for your health and fitness if you do it on a regular basis. 

5. Workus interruptus

We’ve all been there before, when you’re so engrossed in what you’re doing that the time flies by. Before you know it, you’ve been sitting at your desk for four hours straight with your only movement being your eyes across the screen and your fingers flying over the keyboard. This sort of laser-like focus is good when you’re in the zone and getting things done, but it’s not so good for your health and fitness if you do it on a regular basis. 

5. Workus interruptus

We’ve all been there before, when you’re so engrossed in what you’re doing that the time flies by. Before you know it, you’ve been sitting at your desk for four hours straight with your only movement being your eyes across the screen and your fingers flying over the keyboard. This sort of laser-like focus is good when you’re in the zone and getting things done, but it’s not so good for your health and fitness if you do it on a regular basis. 

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