Customer Experience

Growth hacking: 3 Australian companies doing it right

Tomer Garzberg
Entrepreneur

Tomer Garzberg is the Managing Director of StrongmanDigital.com.au and Growth Hacker at TomerGarzberg.com, with over 12 years content and digital marketing experience

Tomer Garzberg
Entrepreneur

Tomer Garzberg is the Managing Director of StrongmanDigital.com.au and Growth Hacker at TomerGarzberg.com, with over 12 years content and digital marketing experience

The internet and the online business world are ablaze with growth hacking. It’s a startup movement that uses data as a backbone to creatively fuel customer conversion, retention and acquisition strategies.

Last month, we covered what growth hacking is and how it can help your business. This time around, we’ll look at some examples of growth hacking in the Australian business landscape, and how to leverage the lessons learned in your own business. 

Two people in a conference room

Atlassian

 

What they do

An Aussie enterprise software company that focuses on software developers and project managers. They’re famous for JIRA, which tracks issues, and Confluence, which is team collaboration.

Growth hacking technique

Eliminate friction points to increase the number of people using it.

Process

With this strategy, Atlassian wanted to learn what parts of their product offering were slowing the uptake of their model or preventing the product from reaching its full capacity. To do this, they developed an A/B test methodology (sometimes referred to as split testing, where you compare two versions of a change to your website simultaneously to monitor which change yields positive user results).

They then proceeded to make minor changes temporarily to their front-end design and processes, and then kept the positive changes (and killed the non-performing ones).

Lessons

Through this process, Atlassian learned that site speed is critical, and refining the call-to-action buttons is highly important. The process actually allowed them to uncover information that taught them about their target market.

Canva
 

What they do

Browser and app-based graphic designs that are simple to create.

Growth Hacking Technique

Create intrigue to kickstart people into getting on board.

Process

Canva wanted a way in which they could playfully show off their user interface to users who were yet to sign up. The background of their signup form contains a blurred out backdrop that you can reveal by moving your cursor over it.

The simple signup form (one-click if you use Facebook connect), coupled with a compelling, desire-based reveal of their fun to use interface, would positively influence users to sign up.

Lessons

By teasing newly acquired traffic with a beautifully designed product, Canva would have the capacity to influence more new users to sign up. By keeping the sign up process ultra-simple, such as using Facebook connect or a simple email and password registration, there’s less chance new users would feel like signing up is a chore.

Pocketbook
 

What they do

Personal transaction categorisation and money tracking.

Growth Hacking Technique

The ‘big guy’ perception.

Process

When Pocketbook were ready for launch, they decided to leverage the credibility of what people already associate with success.

They partnered with Sunrise’s David Koch to promote their app, they managed to be featured in Apple’s app store, as well as press coverage in publications such as News.com.au, CNET and Choice.

Lessons

This was the classic little player punching above their weight, and doing so believably. By tapping into resources with significant audiences over two years, they were able to grow their users from zero to 77,000, with over 100,000 users today.

The interesting thing about growth hacking your business is that you’re only limited by your imagination. By using your own product and market data for direction, you can get extremely creative and tricky with how you refine your product for conversions and retention, and then experiment with new opportunities to get people using your product.

One word of warning, though: what works for others, might not work for you, so it’s important to use existing ‘best practices’ as a guide and inspiration for your own techniques. 

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