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Customer Experience

Breakfast with Tiffany: GRiP

Tiffany Loh
Smarter Writer

Tiffany Loh is the Smarter Business™ & News and Digital Editor, with varied writing experience always looking for a unique story

Tiffany Loh
Smarter Writer

Tiffany Loh is the Smarter Business™ & News and Digital Editor, with varied writing experience always looking for a unique story

Find out how generosity, responsiveness and proximity can boost customer engagement.

Tiffany Loh sits down with Nima Yassini and Robert Hutchison, authors of GRiP: A New Approach to Selling More, to discover how you can improve your grip on customers.

Tiffany Loh has breakfast with the authors of 'GRiP: A New Approach to Selling More

Tiffany Loh: I am here with Nima and Robert from New Republique; they have got a new book out called GRiP.

TL: How did you guys meet?

Nima Yassini: I answered an ad in the paper.  It was a brilliant ad talking about black swans.

Robert Hutchison: Written by me.

NY: The ad was one of the most creative and interesting job ads I have ever seen so I applied and got the position. 

TL: What did you think when you first met Robert?

NY: You know when you know someone is just right and you feel there’s a connection. Our friendship formed very quickly. 

TL: What’s GRiP about?

RH: GRiP is a new marketing model to explain how people are attracted to brands and how they buy products.

NY: The concept comes out of my own relationship and it was looking at the things that caused me and my fiancée to fall in love. We thought that that actually applies to how brands and consumers come together as well.

TL: What does GRiP stand for?

NY: GRiP stands for the three variables: generosity – how generous are you towards your customers without wanting anything back; responsiveness – how well you understand them, what makes them tick, what they like and what they don’t like; and then proximity – how close are you to them in their everyday lives, in their personal lives and in their communities. 

TL: What are the questions business owners should be asking themselves when they want to check their brands’ GRiP?

NY: So a good example is a website – its proximity – if you give price discounts – it’s a good example of generosity.

RH: When you map it out you look at how well you are doing it in each of these things under generosity, responsiveness and proximity. Each gets a score out of five and when you plot how well you’re doing, you add the score up and then that gives you the score on the chart.

NY: The aim is all about harmony and consistency, so you’ll start to fill-in the gaps. It’s a simple model to identify the areas to focus on that drives sales. It’s interesting. We did it for ourselves and we got 50 per cent. We identified the areas we needed to fix and, since then, it’s gone gang busters just by tweaking those little elements. 

TL: How often would you need to reassess your chart?

NY: I think it’s something that you do consistently.

RH: You can’t improve your GRiP score, for example, by a one-off generous act.

NY: Track it against your sales – so look at sales.  The more you do, the more volume you do and the more it’s going to have an impact on your direct numbers.

TL: How do you create GRiP?

NY: If it’s with a new customer, it’s about identifying the areas that have the most impact. If you’re an alcohol brand, being highly generous might not be the most responsible thing to do so you might find that the place to start your GRiP is by driving greater proximity.

So creating GRiP comes out of 1, by category and, 2, where are the areas that are going to have the most traction for a customer.

If you’re an FMCG (Fast-Moving Consumer Goods) then generosity is a big thing because we’re all starved of those extra dollars to buy other stuff.

TL: If you’re losing your GRiP on customers, how do you regain it?

RH: Well, the first thing you have to do is go back to your GRiP score. The key element in GRiP is responsiveness.

NY: Responsiveness is about understanding peoples’ values to better understand how to be generous towards them or how to actually drive proximity with them. 

TL: Are books the new business cards?

NY: I don’t think they’re the new business cards. The reason we wrote this was to help every sized business. The desire was to give people a model that’s worked for us, worked for our clients, and allowed them to actually succeed because it’s a damn hard economy. So if you can help people sell more, why not?

TL: Thanks for joining me for breakfast.

NY: Pleasure.

RH: You’re welcome. Thanks for having us.

TL: Yeah, it’s been great. Where’s our breakfast?!

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