Growth Customer Experience Productivity Business IQ Trends Success Stories Tech Solutions Subscribe Tech Enquiry
Customer Experience

Why nurturing relationships can make the difference

Harry Lowes
Smarter Writer

Harry Lowes is the general manager of digital marketing at Telstra Business

Harry Lowes
Smarter Writer

Harry Lowes is the general manager of digital marketing at Telstra Business

Every interaction with a customer needs to add value to the relationship.

What motivates your customers to choose your business instead of your competitors’? Is it price, quality, reputation or something else? Unless you only intend to sell to a customer once, it’s worth reframing new business from ‘winning a sale’ to ‘winning a new relationship’. Yes, your business offers things with prices attached to them, though you’re also offering the potential for an ongoing exchange of inspiration and information – the things that keep relationships interesting.

Man standing in one end of a can on string

Value is more than price

Your ability to work with your customers, not just sell to them, is what makes a relationship grow from pure exchange to value. Value can be added before the sale by being willing to explore opportunities with the customer, rather than trying to push a specific product or service that you believe offers the best margin. Value can also be added after the sale by being willing to re-engage with customers to explore future opportunities – as well as delivering quality, post-sale support, of course.

Share ideas – and listen too

The best human relationships have great communication at their hearts, whether they’re personal, communal or commercial, allowing us to explore the things we share in common: interests, values and needs. The better our rapport, the better we are positioned to be able to add value to the relationship by offering something new: information, inspiration and suggestion.

A wine producer, for example, can personalise a relationship with a bottle shop owner by understanding what the shop’s customers really like or might be motivated to try. In turn, the winemaker’s story can be shared with customers, along with an exclusive offer. Finally, the bottle shop might collect after-sales customer feedback (drinking notes in this case) to help shape future offers.

Respond to change

Actively look to improve your understanding of each customer’s needs, motivations and interests by regularly asking for feedback. Whether it’s face-to-face, over the phone or online, the feedback you record not only helps you respond to immediate concerns or opportunities, it also helps you stay relevant and improves future sales prospects. Ideally you’ll record feedback as part of the regular maintenance of your customer records. At the basic level, you need to know their contact details are up-to-date; at a more dynamic level, you want to find out how you can continually add value. When you learn more about where your customers are coming from and going to, then you’ll have a better understanding of how your business might play a role in that evolution. It is important to keep the relationship relevant. 

Nurturing customer relationships

  1. Collect the data. The data you collect in each interaction with a customer should be relevant to the task or conversation at hand. If its usefulness is not apparent, you should explain what its future use will be. Asking for a whole lot of detail is time-prohibitive and can result in rejection.
  2. Share valuable information. Look for interesting insights within your industry or area of expertise that you can share with your customers or, better still, share your own thoughts and expert recommendations on how your customers could respond to mutually-relevant trends, events or challenges.
  3. Check-in with customers. At Telstra, checking-in with individual business owners is important in our customer relationship management approach. We want to learn more about what needs resolving, what we’re doing right and how else we can add value to the relationship so that it will grow.
Better connect with your customers

with tips to improve customer service.

Find out more

Five tech trends for small business
Trends
Five tech trends for small business

In an increasingly connected world small businesses need to embrace technologies and tools that can make them stand out from their rivals, according to a Telstra Business Award...

Social media pages give small businesses a platform to show their products to a global audience of potential customers.
Growth
Growth
Not Perfect, but Small Business Still Needs Facebook

Privacy scandals and algorithm changes may have signaled the end of Facebook’s “golden age” as a marketing platform, but for most small businesses it is still an indispensable ...

Cyber security firm, Penten, celebrates winning the 2018 Telstra Business of the Year Award.
Success Stories
Success Stories
Prevention through deception Penten’s recipe for success

Canberra-based cyber security company, Penten, is the 2018 Telstra Australian Business of the Year. The business uses cyber deception strategies to protect Australian governmen...

Simon Rowe, the founder of Sleepbus want to develop a new mobile shelter specifically for women.
Success Stories
Success Stories
Sleepbus a first stop on the road to a better life for the homeless

It’s not okay for women fleeing domestic violence to have to sleep rough, and Sleepbus founder, Simon Rowe, plans to launch a new women’s shelter in Melbourne to provide them w...